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MOUSE TRACKS MEA CULPAS
Blog
Posted on Mar 12 2007 by Greg and Tim

These items will be addressed if a second edition of MOUSE TRACKS is planned. And if it is, we would also like to add these two important items:

  • Clarence Nash was the sole official voice of Donald Duck until his passing in 1985. If he was unavailable or overlooked for a project, other performers may have filled in on a per-project basis, but were never considered Nash's "replacements." Tony Anselmo is now the official voice.
  • In the last section of MOUSE TRACKS, we would have liked to more fully and accurately recognized A&R/producer/executive producer and occasional songwriter, Jay Landers, for his major contributions to the contemporary successes of Walt Disney Records, with record sales estimated at 35 million total.

This is just a sample of the Gold and Platinum
music/aritsts Jay signed, A&R'd or Executive produced for Disney:
Lizzie McGuire (TV and movie soundtrack)
Hilary Duff - (Metamorphisms, Most Wanted, Santa Claus Lane, etc etc.)
Raven-Symone - That's So Raven
Jesse McCartney - Beautiful Soul
Pixar Cars - "Fast Tracks"
Lilo & Stitch - "Island Favorites"
Pixar's "Riders In The Sky" (Grammy® winner)
Pixar's Monster's Inc.- "Scream Factory Favorites" (Grammy winner)
Beauty & The Beast - Celine Dion/Peabo Bryson single
A Whole New World (Aladdin's Theme) - Regina Belle/Peabo Bryson single
Princess Diaries - Soundtrack
Aida - Broadway Cast album
The Cheetah Girls
Hannah Montana
Radio Disney Jams - Vol. 1-7

Writing a nonfiction book is tricky stuff! We hope we can someday rectify all this and do proper justice to all the talented people involved with the story of Walt Disney Records.

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CORRECTIONS
Blog
Posted on Mar 12 2007 by Greg and Tim
Joseph Hicks was kind enough to carefully review MOUSE TRACKS to assure its accuracy, and as happens with nonfiction books, he found some items that we hope to revise if a new edition is published.

Special thanks to Joseph for all care and attention Joseph it took to do all this!

1) p. 11  "Green Grow the Lilacs" as recorded by Fess Parker was released on Columbia Records in 1955, not on Disneyland Records.

2) p. 23  Decca may have passed on the Alice in Wonderland soundtrack album in 1951, but RCA released an album on 78rpm and 45rpm that year, which used many of the same actors who appeared in the film, so technically this would be a "studio cast" album.

3) p.23    The "Alice in Wonderland" album by Tutti Camarata was released in 1957, not 1956.

4) p.23    "Walt Disney Takes You to Disneyland: A Musical Tour of the Magic Kingdom"  not  "...A Musical Tour of Disneyland".

5) p. 29  "We're the Mouseketeers", which was released in 1957, was not the last Mickey Mouse Club album to feature music from the MMC show. It was actually "Songs from Annette and other Walt Disney Serials" which was released in 1958. It contained music and songs from the various serials shown on the Mickey Mouse Club show.

6) p.34  "Little Gems from Big Shows" was released in 1958, not 1957.

7) p.35  The "Old Yeller" Mickey Mouse Club EP, recorded by Jerome Courtland and Kevin Corcoran, was released in 1957 when the film was released, not one year later.

8  p.44  "From All of Us to All of You" was released Christmas 1957, not 1958.

9) p. 46  The film "White Christmas" was released in 1954, not 1952.

10)  p.47  Annette's first album "Annette" was released on Buena Vista Records in the spring of 1959. It was not released on Disneyland Records in 1958 and reissued.

11) p. 97  The "Pirates of the Carribean" Storyteller album was released in 1968, after the ride opened, not in 1966, before it opened. The numbering sequence seems to indicate it was released in 1966, but it must have been held back and released later. The copyright dates say 1968 and the booklet actually has photos of inside the ride, also showing patrons riding through on the boats.

12) p. 108  "The Vulture Song" and "Watcha Gonna Do" were released on a Buena Vista single, not a Disneyland single.

13) p. 116  "Jungle Book II" was released direct to video, it was not released in theaters.

14) p. 121  Bill Lee is the voice of a British gentleman in a top hat in the Haunted Mansion, not the king. The king is on a teeter totter with the queen and has no audio.

15) p. 134  Pat Boone recorded "The Sounds of Christmas"
on a Buena Vista single in 1973. I don't believe it was released on an outside label as well, but I don't know this for certain.

16) p. 191  The box set was titled "The Music of Disney: A Legacy in Song", not "...A Legend in Song".

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Thank you, Michael Barrier!
Blog
Posted on Jan 31 2007 by Greg and Tim
"I read this book late last fall on an airplane, returning from a visit to Washington, D.C., and I must admit that I approached it with skepticism. It seemed like a book that would appeal mostly to a very specialized audience--collectors of Disney records and a few other connoisseurs of Disneyana--and not so much to people like me, with a broader interest in things Disney.

"I was pleasantly surprised. Mouse Tracks is a more attractive and interesting book than I expected, especially in its early chapters, where Walt and Roy Disney--mostly Roy--make frequent appearances. (Merchandise of all kinds was Roy's territory; Walt rarely devoted any time to it.) The book is intelligently organized, with lots of sidebars on individual performers. I might have wished for a little more substantial documentation, but Hollis and Ehrbar have clearly drawn on unimpeachable sources, and I saw nothing to inspire the kind of doubt I've felt when reading so many other officially sanctioned Disney books.

"The illustrations are generally impressive, too. I was particularly taken with the one on page 21, a mid-1950s advertisement for the first Disney soundtrack albums, with beautifully designed jackets for the albums devoted to films like Snow White and Pinocchio. "Disneyland Records' original [soundtrack] LPs were meant to take their place alongside other movie soundtrack albums of the day," the caption reads. "Not until later would they be considered primarily children's records."

- Animation Historian/Author MICHAEL BARRIER






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Mouse Tracks - The Story of Walt Disney Records